Given a prime $p$ and an integer $a$, we say that $a$ is a primitive root $\pmod p$ if the set $\{a,a^2,a^3,\ldots,a^{p-1}\}$

Given a prime $p$ and an integer $a$, we say that $a$ is a primitive root $\pmod p$ if the set $\{a,a^2,a^3,\ldots,a^{p-1}\}$ contains exactly one element congruent to each of $1,2,3,\ldots,p-1\pmod p$.

For example, $2$ is a primitive root $\pmod 5$ because $\{2,2^2,2^3,2^4\}\equiv \{2,4,3,1\}\pmod 5$, and this list contains every residue from $1$ to $4$ exactly once. However, $4$ is not a primitive root $\pmod 5$ because $\{4,4^2,4^3,4^4\}\equiv\{4,1,4,1\}\pmod 5$, and this list does not contain every residue from $1$ to $4$ exactly once.

What is the sum of all integers in the set $\{1,2,3,4,5,6\}$ that are primitive roots $\pmod 7$

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