Which two parts of this passage from chapter 6 of Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights Ilustrate that Hindley Earnshaw Is very willing to his wife?

Which two parts of this passage from chapter 6 of Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights Ilustrate that Hindley Earnshaw Is very willing to his

wife?
Young Earnshaw was altered considerably in the three years of his absence. He had grown sparer, and lost his colour, and spoke and dressed
quite differently; and, on the very day of his return, he told joseph and me we must thenceforth quarter ourselves in the back-kltchen, and leave
the house for him. Indeed, he would have carpeted and papered a small spare room
for a parlour; but his wife expressed such pleasure at the
white floor and huge glowing fireplace, at the pewter dishes and delf-case, and dog-kennel, and the wide space there was to move about In
where they usually sat, that he thought It unnecessary to her comfort, and so dropped the
Intention.
She expressed pleasure, too, at finding a sister among her new acquaintance; and
she prattled to Catherine, and kissed her, and ran about with
her, and gave her quantities of presents, at the beginning. Her affection tired very soon, however, and when she grew peevish, Hindley became
tyrannical. A few words from her, evincing a dislike to Heathcliff, were enough to rouse In him all his old hatred of the boy. He drove him from
their company to the servants, deprived him of the instructions of the curate, and insisted that he should labour out of doors Instead;
compelling him to do so as hard as any other lad on the farm.
Heathcliff bore his degradation pretty well at first, because Cathy taught him what she learnt, and worked or played with him in the flelds.

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